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Allik A, Fazekas G, Barthet M and Sandler M (2016), "myMoodplay: an interactive mood-based music discovery app", In https://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/54577/browse?type=title.
Abstract: myMoodplay is a web app that allows users to interactively discover music by selecting desired emotions. The appli- cation uses the Web Audio API, JavaScript animation for visualisation, linked data formats and a↵ective computing technologies. We explore how artificial intelligence, the Se- mantic Web and audio synthesis can be combined to pro- vide new personalised online musical experiences. Users can choose degrees of energy and pleasantness to shape the de- sired musical mood trajectory. Semantic Web technologies have been embedded in the system to query mood coordi- nates from a triple store using a SPARQL endpoint and to connect to external linked data sources for metadata.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{AllikFazekasBarthetEtAl,
  author = {Allik, A and Fazekas, G and Barthet, M and Sandler, M},
  title = {myMoodplay: an interactive mood-based music discovery app},
  booktitle = {https://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/54577/browse?type=title}
}
Barthet, M, Fazekas, G, Allik, A, Thalmann, F S, Sandler, M B (2016), "From Interactive to Adaptive Mood-Based Music Listening Experiences in Social or Personal Contexts", Journal of the Audio Engineering Society. Vol. 64 Audio Engineering Society.
Abstract: Listeners of audio are increasingly shifting to a participatory culture where technology allows them to modify and control the listening experience. This report describes the developments of a mood-driven music player, Moodplay, which incorporates semantic computing technologies for musical mood using social tags and informative and aesthetic browsing visualizations. The prototype runs with a dataset of over 10,000 songs covering various genres, arousal, and valence levels. Changes in the design of the system were made in response to user evaluations from over 120 participants in 15 different sectors of work or education. The proposed client/server architecture integrates modular components powered by semantic web technologies and audio content feature extraction. This enables recorded music content to be controlled in flexible and nonlinear ways. Dynamic music objects can be used to create mashups on the fly of two or more simultaneous songs to allow selection of multiple moods. The authors also consider nonlinear audio techniques that could transform the player into a creative tool, for instance, by reorganizing, compressing, or expanding temporally prerecorded content.
BibTeX:
@article{Barthet,
  author = {Barthet, M, Fazekas, G, Allik, A, Thalmann, F S, Sandler, M B},
  title = {From Interactive to Adaptive Mood-Based Music Listening Experiences in Social or Personal Contexts},
  journal = {Journal of the Audio Engineering Society},
  publisher = {Audio Engineering Society},
  volume = {64},
  year = {2016}
}
Barthet M, Fazekas G, Allik A and Sandler M (2015), "Moodplay: an interactive mood-based musical experience.", In Audio Mostly Conference. , pp. 3:1-3:1. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{BarthetFazekasAllikEtAl2015,
  author = {Barthet, M and Fazekas, G and Allik, A and Sandler, MB},
  editor = {Kalliris, G and Dimoulas, C},
  title = {Moodplay: an interactive mood-based musical experience.},
  booktitle = {Audio Mostly Conference},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2015},
  pages = {3:1--3:1},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2814895},
  doi = {10.1145/2814895.2814922}
}
Barthet M, Thalmann F, Fazekas G, Sandler M and Wiggins G (2016), "Crossroads: Interactive Music Systems Transforming Performance, Production and Listening", In ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Workshop on Music and HCI., May, 2016.
Abstract: We discuss several state-of-the-art systems that propose
new paradigms and user workflows for music composition,
production, performance, and listening. We focus on a selection
of systems that exploit recent advances in semantic
and affective computing, music information retrieval (MIR)
and semantic web, as well as insights from fields such as
mobile computing and information visualisation. These systems
offer the potential to provide transformative experiences
for users, which is manifested in creativity, engagement,
efficiency, discovery and affect.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{BarthetThalmannFazekasEtAl2016,
  author = {Barthet, M and Thalmann, F and Fazekas, G and Sandler, M and Wiggins, G},
  title = {Crossroads: Interactive Music Systems Transforming Performance, Production and Listening},
  booktitle = {ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), Workshop on Music and HCI},
  year = {2016}
}
Benetos E, Ewert S and Weyde T (2014), "Automatic Transcription Of Pitched And Unpitched Sounds From Polyphonic Music", In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP). Florence, Italy , pp. 3131-3135.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{BenetosEwertWeyde2014,
  author = {Benetos, E and Ewert, S and Weyde, T},
  title = {Automatic Transcription Of Pitched And Unpitched Sounds From Polyphonic Music},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP)},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {3131--3135},
  note = {codedemo: http://code.soundsoftware.ac.uk/projects/pu_amt/},
  doi = {10.1109/ICASSP.2014.6854172}
}
Benetos E and Weyde T (2015), "An efficient temporally-constrained probabilistic model for multiple-instrument music transcription", In http://ismir2015.uma.es/docs/ISMIR2015_Proceedings.pdf. Emmanouil Benetos, Queen Mary University of London, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS, United Kingdom, Oct, 2015. , pp. 701-707. International Society for Music Information Retrieval.
Abstract: In this paper, an efficient, general-purpose model for multiple instrument polyphonic music transcription is proposed. The model is based on probabilistic latent component analysis and supports the use of sound state spectral templates, which represent the temporal evolution of each note (e.g. attack, sustain, decay). As input, a variable-Q transform (VQT) time-frequency representation is used. Computational efficiency is achieved by supporting the use of pre-extracted and pre-shifted sound state templates. Two variants are presented: without temporal constraints and with hidden Markov model-based constraints controlling the appearance of sound states. Experiments are performed on benchmark transcription datasets: MAPS, TRIOS, MIREX multiF0, and Bach10; results on multi-pitch detection and instrument assignment show that the proposed models outperform the state-of-the-art for multiple-instrument transcription and is more than 20 times faster compared to a previous sound state-based model. We finally show that a VQT representation can lead to improved multi-pitch detection performance compared with constant-Q representations.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{BenetosWeyde2015,
  author = {Benetos, E and Weyde, T},
  editor = {Wiering, F and Müller, M},
  title = {An efficient temporally-constrained probabilistic model for multiple-instrument music transcription},
  booktitle = {http://ismir2015.uma.es/docs/ISMIR2015_Proceedings.pdf},
  publisher = {International Society for Music Information Retrieval},
  year = {2015},
  pages = {701--707},
  url = {http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ emmanouilb/}
}
Benford S (2015), "Of Guitars, Stories, Luthiery and Hybrid Craft", In Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition. New York, NY, USA , pp. 1-1. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Benford2015,
  author = {Benford, Steve},
  title = {Of Guitars, Stories, Luthiery and Hybrid Craft},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Creativity and Cognition},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2015},
  pages = {1--1},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2757226.2757256},
  doi = {10.1145/2757226.2757256}
}
Benford S, Hazzard A, Chamberlain A, Glover K, Greenhalgh C, Xu L, Hoare M and Darzentas D (2016), "Experiencing the Carolan Guitar", In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA , pp. 3651-3654. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Benford:2016:ECG:2851581.2890264,
  author = {Benford, Steve and Hazzard, Adrian and Chamberlain, Alan and Glover, Kevin and Greenhalgh, Chris and Xu, Liming and Hoare, Michaela and Darzentas, Dimitrios},
  title = {Experiencing the Carolan Guitar},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {3651--3654},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2851581.2890264},
  doi = {10.1145/2851581.2890264}
}
Benford S, Hazzard A, Chamberlain A, Glover K, Greenhalgh C, Xu L, Hoare M and Darzentas D (2016), "Accountable Artefacts: The Case of the Carolan Guitar", In Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York, NY, USA , pp. 1163-1175. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{BenfordHazzardChamberlainEtAl2016,
  author = {Benford, Steve and Hazzard, Adrian and Chamberlain, Alan and Glover, Kevin and Greenhalgh, Chris and Xu, Liming and Hoare, Michaela and Darzentas, Dimitrios},
  title = {Accountable Artefacts: The Case of the Carolan Guitar},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1163--1175},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2858036.2858306},
  doi = {10.1145/2858036.2858306}
}
Benford S, Hazzard A and Xu L (2015), "The Carolan Guitar: A Thing That Tells Its Own Life Story", interactions. New York, NY, USA, April, 2015. Vol. 22(3), pp. 64-66. ACM.
BibTeX:
@article{BenfordHazzardXu2015,
  author = {Benford, Steve and Hazzard, Adrian and Xu, Liming},
  title = {The Carolan Guitar: A Thing That Tells Its Own Life Story},
  journal = {interactions},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {22},
  number = {3},
  pages = {64--66},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2745960},
  doi = {10.1145/2745960}
}
Benford S, Hazzard A and Xu L (2015), "The Carolan Guitar: A Thing That Tells Its Own Life Story", interactions. New York, NY, USA, April, 2015. Vol. 22(3), pp. 64-66. ACM.
BibTeX:
@article{BenfordHazzardXu2015a,
  author = {Benford, Steve and Hazzard, Adrian and Xu, Liming},
  title = {The Carolan Guitar: A Thing That Tells Its Own Life Story},
  journal = {interactions},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {22},
  number = {3},
  pages = {64--66},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2745960},
  doi = {10.1145/2745960}
}
Chamberlain A, Bødker M, Hazzard A and Benford S (2016), "Audio in Place: Media, Mobility &38; HCI - Creating Meaning in Space", In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct. New York, NY, USA , pp. 1045-1048. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Chamberlain:2016:APM:2957265.2964195,
  author = {Chamberlain, Alan and Bødker, Mads and Hazzard, Adrian and Benford, Steve},
  title = {Audio in Place: Media, Mobility &38; HCI - Creating Meaning in Space},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1045--1048},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2957265.2964195},
  doi = {10.1145/2957265.2964195}
}
Chamberlain A and Crabtree A (2016), "Searching for music: understanding the discovery, acquisition, processing and organization of music in a domestic setting for design", Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. , pp. 1-13.
Abstract: This series of studies make it clear that a wide range of both physical and digital resources are involved in domestic music consumption. The selection of digital resources is particularly evident, and it can be observed that domestic music consumption is a fragmented business, taking advantage of many different ``channels'' for getting, using and preparing music. While there are not a series of common channels, each home displayed a variety of methods in respect to using metadata in multiple different modalities: regardless, the activities involved in getting, using and preparing music cohere through a noticeable, emergent set of workflows. We find that not only does metadata support searching, as one might expect, but also it pervades all parts of the workflow and is used in real-time as a reflexive artifact and in terms of its future perceived/prescribed use. The findings of the research raise a series of possibilities and issues that form the basis for understanding and designing for metadata use.
BibTeX:
@article{ChamberlainCrabtree2016,
  author = {Chamberlain, Alan and Crabtree, Andy},
  title = {Searching for music: understanding the discovery, acquisition, processing and organization of music in a domestic setting for design},
  journal = {Personal and Ubiquitous Computing},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1--13},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-016-0911-2},
  doi = {10.1007/s00779-016-0911-2}
}
Chamberlain A and Hazzard A (2015), "Sonifying the Scene: re-framing and manipulating meaning through audio augmentation", In DMRN+10: Digital Music Research Network One-day Workshop 2015., December, 2015.
Abstract: Digital locative music technologies are transforming the ways in which we are able to manipulate and re-frame the meaning of architecture, landscape and art. In this note we explore and outline some of the key features that are associated with this. Defining the future possibilities and challenges that we have identified through our re-search in the area. Our work is supported by examples and critically assesses the relationship between physical and aural presence, examining the manipulation and re-framing of meaning through audio augmentation. “Is Space Audible?” [7].
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ChamberlainHazzard2015,
  author = {Alan Chamberlain and Adrian Hazzard},
  title = {Sonifying the Scene: re-framing and manipulating meaning through audio augmentation},
  booktitle = {DMRN+10: Digital Music Research Network One-day Workshop 2015},
  year = {2015},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/32858/}
}
Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M (2016), "Automatic Tagging using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks" ISMIR.
Abstract: We present a content-based automatic music tagging algorithm using fully convolutional neural networks (FCNs). We evaluate different architectures consisting of 2D convolutional layers and subsampling layers only. In the experiments, we measure the AUC-ROC scores of the architectures with different complexities and input types using the MagnaTagATune dataset, where a 4-layer architecture shows state-of-the-art performance with mel-spectrogram input. Furthermore, we evaluated the performances of the architectures with varying the number of layers on a larger dataset (Million Song Dataset), and found that deeper models outperformed the 4-layer architecture. The experiments show that mel-spectrogram is an effective time-frequency representation for automatic tagging and that more complex models benefit from more training data.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Choi,
  author = {Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M},
  title = {Automatic Tagging using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks},
  publisher = {ISMIR}
}
Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M (2016), "Towards Playlist Generation Algorithms using RNNs Trained on Within-Track Transitions", Workshop on Surprise, Opposition, and Obstruction in Adaptive and Personalized Systems (SOAP), Halifax, Canada
Abstract: We introduce a novel playlist generation algorithm that focuses on the quality of transitions using a recurrent neural network (RNN). The proposed model assumes that optimal transitions between tracks can be modelled and predicted by internal transitions within music tracks. We introduce modelling sequences of high-level music descriptors using RNNs and discuss an experiment involving different similarity functions, where the sequences are provided by a musical structural analysis algorithm. Qualitative observations show that the proposed approach can effectively model transitions of music tracks in playlists.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Choib,
  author = {Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M},
  title = {Towards Playlist Generation Algorithms using RNNs Trained on Within-Track Transitions}
}
Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M, McFee, B (2016), "Towards Music Captioning: Generating Music Playlist Descriptions", ISMIR
Abstract: Descriptions are often provided along with recommenda- tions to help users’ discovery. Recommending automati- cally generated music playlists (e.g. personalised playlists) introduces the problem of generating descriptions. In this paper, we propose a method for generating music playlist descriptions, which is called as music captioning. In the proposed method, audio content analysis and natural lan- guage processing are adopted to utilise the information of each track.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Choia,
  author = {Choi, K, Fazekas, G, Sandler, M, McFee, B},
  title = {Towards Music Captioning: Generating Music Playlist Descriptions}
}
Choi K, Fazekas G and Sandler M (2015), "Understanding Music Playlists", In International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML) 2015., Jul, 2015.
Abstract: As music streaming services dominate the music industry, the playlist is becoming an increasingly crucial element of music consumption. Consequently, the music recommendation problem is often casted as a playlist generation problem. Better understanding of the playlist is therefore necessary for developing better playlist generation algorithms. In this work, we analyse two playlist datasets to investigate some commonly assumed hypotheses about playlists. Our findings indicate that deeper understanding of playlists is needed to provide better prior information and improve machine learning algorithms in the design of recommendation systems.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ChoiFazekasSandler2015,
  author = {Choi, K and Fazekas, G and Sandler, M},
  title = {Understanding Music Playlists},
  booktitle = {International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML) 2015},
  year = {2015},
  url = {https://keunwoochoi.wordpress.com/}
}
Choi K, Fazekas G, Sandler M and Kim J (2015), "Auralisation of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks: Listening to Learned Features", In International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference., Oct, 2015. ISMIR.
Abstract: Deep learning has been actively adopted in the field of music information retrieval, e.g. genre classification, mood detection, and chord recognition. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs), one of the most popular deep learning approach, also have been used for these tasks. However, the process of learning and prediction is little understood, particularly when it is applied to spectrograms. We introduce auralisation of CNNs to understand its underlying mechanism.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ChoiFazekasSandlerEtAl2015,
  author = {Choi, K and Fazekas, G and Sandler, MARK and Kim, J},
  title = {Auralisation of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks: Listening to Learned Features},
  booktitle = {International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference},
  publisher = {ISMIR},
  year = {2015},
  url = {https://keunwoochoi.wordpress.com/}
}
Choi K, Sandler M and Fazekas G (2016), "Text-based LSTM networks for Automatic Music Composition", In Conference on Computer Simulation of Musical Creativity. Keunwoo Choi, Queen Mary University of London, EECS, Peter Landin Building, CS.319, London, E1 4FZ, United Kingdom, Jun, 2016.
Abstract: In this paper, we introduce new methods and discuss results of text-based LSTM (Long Short-Term Memory) networks for automatic music composition. The proposed network is designed to learn relationships within text documents that represent chord progressions and drum tracks in two case studies. In the experiments, word-RNNs (Recurrent Neural Networks) show good results for both cases, while character-based RNNs (char-RNNs) only succeed to learn chord progressions. The proposed system can be used for fully automatic composition or as semi-automatic systems that help humans to compose music by controlling a diversity parameter of the model.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ChoiSandlerFazekas2016,
  author = {Choi, K and Sandler, M and Fazekas, G},
  title = {Text-based LSTM networks for Automatic Music Composition},
  booktitle = {Conference on Computer Simulation of Musical Creativity},
  year = {2016}
}
De Man B, Mora-Mcginity M, Fazekas G and Reiss J (2014), "The Open Multitrack Testbed", In 137th AES Convention.. Thesis at: Los Angeles., Oct, 2014.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{DeManMora-McginityFazekasEtAl2014,
  author = {De Man, B and Mora-Mcginity, M and Fazekas, G and Reiss, JD},
  title = {The Open Multitrack Testbed},
  booktitle = {137th AES Convention},
  school = {Los Angeles},
  year = {2014}
}
De Roure D, Klyne G, Page K, Pybus J and Weigl D (2015), "Music and Science: Parallels in Production", In 2nd International Workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology. Knoxwille, TN, USA
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{DeRoureKlynePageEtAl2015,
  author = {De Roure, David and Klyne, Graham and Page, Kevin and Pybus, John and Weigl, David},
  title = {Music and Science: Parallels in Production},
  booktitle = {2nd International Workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology},
  year = {2015}
}
Driedger J, Muller M and Ewert S (2014), "Improving Time-Scale Modification of Music Signals Using Harmonic-Percussive Separation", IEEE Signal Processing Letters., Jan, 2014. Vol. 21, pp. 105-109.
BibTeX:
@article{DriedgerMullerEwert2014,
  author = {Driedger, J and Muller, M and Ewert, S},
  title = {Improving Time-Scale Modification of Music Signals Using Harmonic-Percussive Separation},
  journal = {IEEE Signal Processing Letters},
  year = {2014},
  volume = {21},
  pages = {105--109},
  doi = {10.1109/LSP.2013.2294023}
}
Ewert, S, Sandler, M (2016), "Piano transcription in the studio using an extensible alternating directions framework", IEEE/ACM Transactions on Audio Speech and Language Processing., Nov, 2016. Vol. 24, pp. 1983-1997.
Abstract: © 2016 IEEE.Given a musical audio recording, the goal of automatic music transcription is to determine a score-like representation of the piece underlying the recording. Despite significant interest within the research community, several studies have reported on a 'glass ceiling' effect, an apparent limit on the transcription accuracy that current methods seem incapable of overcoming. In this paper, we explore how much this effect can be mitigated by focusing on a specific instrument class and making use of additional information on the recording conditions available in studio or home recording scenarios. In particular, exploiting the availability of single note recordings for the instrument in use, we develop a novel signal model employing variable-length spectro-temporal patterns as its central building blocks - tailored for pitched percussive instruments such as the piano. Temporal dependencies between spectral templates are modeled, resembling characteristics of factorial scaled hidden Markov models (FS-HMM) and other methods combining nonnegative matrix factorization with Markov processes. In contrast to FS-HMMs, our parameter estimation is developed in a global, relaxed form within the extensible alternating direction method of multipliers framework, which enables the systematic combination of basic regularizers propagating sparsity and local stationarity in note activity with more complex regularizers imposing temporal semantics. The proposed method achieves an f -measure of 93-95% for note onsets on pieces recorded on a Yamaha Disklavier (MAPS DB).
BibTeX:
@article{Ewert2016,
  author = {Ewert, S, Sandler, M},
  title = {Piano transcription in the studio using an extensible alternating directions framework},
  journal = {IEEE/ACM Transactions on Audio Speech and Language Processing},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {24},
  pages = {1983--1997},
  doi = {10.1109/TASLP.2016.2593801}
}
Ewert S (2016), "Representation of Musical Structure for a Computationally Feasible Integration with Audio-Based Methods", Dagstuhl Reports (Computational Music Structure Analysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 16092)). Dagstuhl, Germany, Oct, 2016. Vol. 6(2), pp. 175-176. Schloss Dagstuhl–Leibniz-Zentrum fuer Informatik.
Abstract: In terms of terminology, “musical structure” has been used in several, different contexts. In one interpretation, musical structure is essentially equivalent to musical form, which can be considered as a genre or rather style specific definition of the expectation of how a piece is composed on a rather global level. Another interpretation of structure is closer to the corresponding mathematical notion, where structure yields properties and regularity.
BibTeX:
@article{Ewert2016a,
  author = {Ewert, S},
  editor = {Müller, M and Chew, E and Bello, JP},
  title = {Representation of Musical Structure for a Computationally Feasible Integration with Audio-Based Methods},
  journal = {Dagstuhl Reports (Computational Music Structure Analysis (Dagstuhl Seminar 16092))},
  publisher = {Schloss Dagstuhl–Leibniz-Zentrum fuer Informatik},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {6},
  number = {2},
  pages = {175--176},
  note = {urn: urn:nbn:de:0030-drops-61415},
  url = {http://drops.dagstuhl.de/opus/volltexte/2016/6141},
  doi = {10.4230/DagRep.6.2.147}
}
Ewert S, Pardo B, Mueller M and Plumbley M (2014), "Score-Informed Source Separation for Musical Audio Recordings: An overview", IEEE Signal Processing Magazine., May, 2014. Vol. 31, pp. 116-124.
BibTeX:
@article{EwertPardoMuellerEtAl2014,
  author = {Ewert, S and Pardo, B and Mueller, M and Plumbley, MD},
  title = {Score-Informed Source Separation for Musical Audio Recordings: An overview},
  journal = {IEEE Signal Processing Magazine},
  year = {2014},
  volume = {31},
  pages = {116--124},
  doi = {10.1109/MSP.2013.2296076}
}
Ewert S, Plumbley M and Sandler M (2014), "Accounting for phase cancellations in non-negative matrix factorization using weighted distances", In Proceedings of the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2014)., May, 2014. , pp. 649-653. IEEE.
Abstract: Techniques based on non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) have been successfully used to decompose a spectrogram of a music recording into a dictionary of templates and activations. While advanced NMF variants often yield robust signal models, there are usually some inaccuracies in the factorization since the underlying methods are not prepared for phase cancellations that occur when sounds with similar frequency are mixed. In this paper, we present a novel method that takes phase cancellations into account to refine dictionaries learned by NMF-based methods. Our approach exploits the fact that advanced NMF methods are often robust enough to provide information about how sound sources interact in a spectrogram, where they overlap, and thus where phase cancellations could occur. Using this information, the distances used in NMF are weighted entry-wise to attenuate the influence of regions with phase cancellations. Experiments on full-length, polyphonic piano recordings indicate that our method can be successfully used to refine NMF-based dictionaries
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{EwertPlumbleySandler2014,
  author = {Ewert, S and Plumbley, MD and Sandler, M},
  title = {Accounting for phase cancellations in non-negative matrix factorization using weighted distances},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2014)},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {649--653},
  url = {http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6853676&queryText=cancellations:},
  doi = {10.1109/ICASSP.2014.6853676}
}
Ewert S, Plumbley M and Sandler M (2015), "A dynamic programming variant of non-negative matrix deconvolution for the transcription of struck string instruments", In ICASSP, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing - Proceedings., Jan, 2015. Vol. 2015-August, pp. 569-573.
Abstract: © 2015 IEEE. Given a musical audio recording, the goal of music transcription is to determine a score-like representation of the piece underlying the recording. Most current transcription methods employ variants of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), which often fails to robustly model instruments producing non-stationary sounds. Using entire time-frequency patterns to represent sounds, non-negative matrix deconvolution (NMD) can capture certain types of non-stationary behavior but is only applicable if all sounds have the same length. In this paper, we present a novel method that combines the non-stationarity modeling capabilities available with NMD with the variable note lengths possible with NMF. Identifying frames in NMD patterns with states in a dynamical system, our method iteratively generates sound-object candidates separately for each pitch, which are then combined in a global optimization. We demonstrate the transcription capabilities of our method using piano pieces assuming the availability of single note recordings as training data.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{EwertPlumbleySandler2015,
  author = {Ewert, S and Plumbley, MD and Sandler, M},
  title = {A dynamic programming variant of non-negative matrix deconvolution for the transcription of struck string instruments},
  booktitle = {ICASSP, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing - Proceedings},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {2015-August},
  pages = {569--573},
  doi = {10.1109/ICASSP.2015.7178033}
}
García J, Taglialatela C, Kudumakis P, Tardón L, Barbancho I and Sandler M (2014), "Interactive music applications by MPEG-A support in Sonic Visualiser", In 53rd AES International Conference on "Semantic Audio"., Jan, 2014.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{GarciaTaglialatelaKudumakisEtAl2014,
  author = {García, JC and Taglialatela, C and Kudumakis, P and Tardón, LJ and Barbancho, I and Sandler, M},
  title = {Interactive music applications by MPEG-A support in Sonic Visualiser},
  booktitle = {53rd AES International Conference on "Semantic Audio"},
  year = {2014},
  url = {http://www.aes.org/e-lib/browse.cfm?elib=17097}
}
Greenhalgh C, Benford S and Hazzard A (2016), "^ muzicode$: composing and performing musical codes", In Audio Mostly 2016., October, 2016. , pp. 1-8.
Abstract: We present muzicodes, an approach to incorporating machine-readable ‘codes’ into music that allows the performer and/or composer to flexibly define what constitutes a code, and to perform around it. These codes can then act as triggers, for example to control an accompaniment or visuals during a performance. The codes can form an integral part of the music (composition and/or performance), and may be more or less obviously present. This creates a rich space of playful interaction with a system that recognises and responds to the codes. Our proof of concept implementation works with audio or MIDI as input. Muzicodes are represented textually and regular expressions are used to flexibly define them. We present two contrasting demonstration applications and summarise the findings from two workshops with potential users which highlight opportunities and challenges, especially in relation to specifying and matching codes and playing and performing with the system.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{nott37081,
  author = {Chris Greenhalgh and Steve Benford and Adrian Hazzard},
  title = {^ muzicode$: composing and performing musical codes},
  booktitle = {Audio Mostly 2016},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1--8},
  note = {ACM 978-1-4503-4822-5. doi:10.1145/2986444},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/37081/}
}
Greenhalgh C, Hazzard A, McGrath S and Benford S (2016), "GeoTracks: Adaptive Music for Everyday Journeys", In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM on Multimedia Conference. New York, NY, USA , pp. 42-46. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Greenhalgh:2016:GAM:2964284.2967181,
  author = {Greenhalgh, Chris and Hazzard, Adrian and McGrath, Sean and Benford, Steve},
  title = {GeoTracks: Adaptive Music for Everyday Journeys},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 ACM on Multimedia Conference},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {42--46},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2964284.2967181},
  doi = {10.1145/2964284.2967181}
}
Hayes K, Barthet M, Wu Y, Zhang L and Bryan-Kinns N (2016), "A Participatory Live Music Performance with the Open Symphony System", In ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI): Interactivity., May, 2016.
Abstract: Our Open Symphony system reimagines the music
experience for a digital age, fostering alliances between
performer and audience and our digital selves. Open
Symphony enables live participatory music performance
where the audience actively engages in the music
creation process. This is made possible by using stateof-
the-art web technologies and data visualisation
techniques. Through collaborations with local
performers we will conduct a series of interactive music
performance revolutionizing the performance
experience both for performers and audiences. The
system throws open music-creating possibilities to
every participant and is a genuine novel way to
demonstrate the field of Human Computer Interaction
through computer-supported cooperative creation and
multimodal music and visual perception.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{HayesBarthetWuEtAl2016,
  author = {Hayes, K and Barthet, M and Wu, Y and Zhang, L and Bryan-Kinns, N},
  title = {A Participatory Live Music Performance with the Open Symphony System},
  booktitle = {ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI): Interactivity},
  year = {2016},
  doi = {10.1145/2851581.2889471}
}
Hazzard A, Benford S, Chamberlain A and Greenhalgh C (2015), "Considering musical structure in location-based experiences", In New Interfaces for Musical Expression., May, 2015. , pp. 1-4.
Abstract: Locative music experiences are often non-linear and as such the final structure of the music heard is guided by the movements of the user. We note an absence of principles regarding how composers should approach the structuring of such locative soundtracks. For instance, how does one compose for a non-linear soundtrack using linear, pre-composed placed sounds, where fixed musical time is placed into the indeterminate time of the user’s experience? Furthermore, how does one create a soundtrack that is suitable for the location, but also functions as a coherent musical structure? We explore these questions by analyzing an existing ‘placed sound’ work from a traditional music theory perspective and in doing so reveal some structural principals from ‘fixed’ musical forms can also support the composition of contemporary locative music experiences.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{HazzardBenfordChamberlainEtAl2015,
  author = {Adrian Hazzard and Steve Benford and Alan Chamberlain and Chris Greenhalgh},
  title = {Considering musical structure in location-based experiences},
  booktitle = {New Interfaces for Musical Expression},
  year = {2015},
  pages = {1--4},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/33143/}
}
Hazzard A, Benford S, Chamberlain A, Greenhalgh C and Kwon H (2014), "Musical intersections across the digital and physical", In DMRN+9: Digital Music Research Network (EPSRC).
Abstract: Digital musical experiences are commonplace, everyday occurrences for many of us. Digital technologies facilitate where, how and what we access, and they increasingly offer new methods for capturing, sharing, enhancing and supporting such musical experiences.

Presented here is a sample of distinct research activities where we have engaged with a cross section of digital tools to augment novel musical experiences in the physical world, harnessing the mobile and the tangible.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{HazzardBenfordChamberlainEtAl2014,
  author = {Adrian Hazzard and Steve Benford and Alan Chamberlain and Chris Greenhalgh and Hyosun Kwon},
  title = {Musical intersections across the digital and physical},
  booktitle = {DMRN+9: Digital Music Research Network (EPSRC)},
  year = {2014},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/27864/}
}
Herrero G, Kudumakis P, Tardon L, Barbancho I and Sandler M (2013), "An HTML5 Interactive (MPEG-A IM AF) Music Player", In 10th International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research (CMMR'13)., Oct, 2013. , pp. 562-569.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{HerreroKudumakisTardonEtAl2013,
  author = {Herrero, G and Kudumakis, P and Tardon, LJ and Barbancho, I and Sandler, M},
  title = {An HTML5 Interactive (MPEG-A IM AF) Music Player},
  booktitle = {10th International Symposium on Computer Music Multidisciplinary Research (CMMR'13)},
  year = {2013},
  pages = {562--569},
  url = {http://www.cmmr2013.cnrs-mrs.fr/Docs/CMMR2013Proceedings.pdf#page=562}
}
Howard E and De Roure D (2015), "Turning Numbers into Notes", In Ada Lovelace Symposium 2015- Celebrating 200 Years of a Computer Visionary. New York, NY, USA ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{HowardDeRoure2015,
  author = {Howard, Emily and De Roure, David},
  title = {Turning Numbers into Notes},
  booktitle = {Ada Lovelace Symposium 2015- Celebrating 200 Years of a Computer Visionary},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2015},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2867731.2867746},
  doi = {10.1145/2867731.2867746}
}
Kanjo E, Al-Husain L and Chamberlain A (2015), "Emotions in context: examining pervasive affective sensing systems, applications, and analyses", Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. Vol. 19(7), pp. 1197-1212.
Abstract: Pervasive sensing has opened up new opportunities for measuring our feelings and understanding our behavior by monitoring our affective states while mobile. This review paper surveys pervasive affect sensing by examining and considering three major elements of affective pervasive systems, namely ``sensing,'' ``analysis,'' and ``application.'' Sensing investigates the different sensing modalities that are used in existing real-time affective applications, analysis explores different approaches to emotion recognition and visualization based on different types of collected data, and application investigates different leading areas of affective applications. For each of the three aspects, the paper includes an extensive survey of the literature and finally outlines some of challenges and future research opportunities of affective sensing in the context of pervasive computing.
BibTeX:
@article{KanjoAl-HusainChamberlain2015,
  author = {Kanjo, Eiman and Al-Husain, Luluah and Chamberlain, Alan},
  title = {Emotions in context: examining pervasive affective sensing systems, applications, and analyses},
  journal = {Personal and Ubiquitous Computing},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {19},
  number = {7},
  pages = {1197--1212},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-015-0842-3},
  doi = {10.1007/s00779-015-0842-3}
}
Klyne G, Willoughby C and Page K (), "Annalist: A practical tool for creating, managing and sharing evolving linked data"
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{KlyneWilloughbyPage,
  author = {Graham Klyne and Cerys Willoughby and Kevin Page},
  title = {Annalist: A practical tool for creating, managing and sharing evolving linked data},
  url = {http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1593/#article-10}
}
Kudumakis P, Sandler M, Anadiotis A-C, Venieris I, Difino A, Wang X, Tropea G, Grafl M, Rodríguez-Doncel V, Llorente S and Delgado J (2014), "MPEG-M: A digital media ecosystem for interoperable applications", Signal Processing: Image Communication., Jan, 2014. Vol. 29, pp. 150-166.
BibTeX:
@article{KudumakisSandlerAnadiotisEtAl2014,
  author = {Kudumakis, P and Sandler, M and Anadiotis, A-CG and Venieris, IS and Difino, A and Wang, X and Tropea, G and Grafl, M and Rodríguez-Doncel, V and Llorente, S and Delgado, J},
  title = {MPEG-M: A digital media ecosystem for interoperable applications},
  journal = {Signal Processing: Image Communication},
  year = {2014},
  volume = {29},
  pages = {150--166},
  note = {publisher: Elsevier articletitle: MPEG-M: A digital media ecosystem for interoperable applications journaltitle: Signal Processing: Image Communication articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.image.2013.10.006 content_type: article copyright: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  doi = {10.1016/j.image.2013.10.006}
}
McGrath S, Chamberlain A and Benford S (2016), "Making Music Together: An Exploration of Amateur and Pro-Am Grime Music Production", In Audio Mostly 2016., October, 2016.
Abstract: This novel research presents the results of an ethnographic study, which focused upon the production of an EP created by an amateur and a pro-amateur producer. The research presents their production practices across the production workflow, from inception and ideation through to completion. The paper describes the distinct processes that occur when collaborating on the production of the EP. The exploration here discusses the use of software systems to facilitate production of a series of music tracks. We further explicate the use of technologies in the production settings, and these range from mobile devices (smartphones) through to digital audio workstations. Further to this, we start to map out how the technology used affords and supports collaboration and communication across a distributed context. We respond to our findings by presenting a series of design implications that address the research.

Citation
Sean McGrath, Alan Chamberlain & Steve Benford (2016) “Making Music Together: An Exploration of Amateur and Pro-Am Grime Music Production”, Audio Mostly 2016, October 4-6 Norrköping, Sweden, ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{nott37501,
  author = {Sean McGrath and Alan Chamberlain and Steve Benford},
  title = {Making Music Together: An Exploration of Amateur and Pro-Am Grime Music Production},
  booktitle = {Audio Mostly 2016},
  year = {2016},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/37501/}
}
McGrath S, Chamberlain A and Benford S (2016), "The Grime Scene: Social Media, Music, Creation and Consumption", In Audio Mostly 2016., October, 2016.
Abstract: In this paper we start to explore and unpack the work of Grime music producers and performers with a focus on their attitudes, working practices and use of social media. We explore the origins of grime and describe a complex set of interactions between people and technology in order to facilitate the production and dissemination of audio content in an evolving digital climate. We explore how individuals in this space curate and collect content, with a view to reuse in the future. We also explore how grime is evolving and ways in which technology might be able to facilitate many of these processes more effectively. Finally, we explore technological issues that pertain to music production and dissemination in its current state and implications for design for future applications and contexts.

Citation
Sean McGrath, Alan Chamberlain & Steve Benford (2016) “The Grime Scene: Social Media, Music, Creation and Consumption”, Audio Mostly 2016, October 4-6 Norrköping, Sweden, ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{nott37503,
  author = {Sean McGrath and Alan Chamberlain and Steve Benford},
  title = {The Grime Scene: Social Media, Music, Creation and Consumption},
  booktitle = {Audio Mostly 2016},
  year = {2016},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/37503/}
}
Mcpherson A, Jack R and Moro G (2016), "Action-Sound Latency: Are Our Tools Fast Enough?", In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, July 11-15, 2016., Jul, 2016.
Abstract: The importance of low and consistent latency in interactive music systems is well-established. So how do commonly-used tools for creating digital musical instruments and other tangible interfaces perform in terms of latency from user action to sound output? This paper examines several common configurations where a microcontroller (e.g. Arduino) or wireless device communicates with computer-based sound generator (e.g. Max/MSP, Pd). We find that, perhaps surprisingly, almost none of the tested configurations meet generally-accepted guidelines for latency and jitter. To address this limitation, the paper presents a new embedded platform, Bela, which is capable of complex audio and sensor processing at submillisecond latency.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{McphersonJackMoro2016,
  author = {Mcpherson, AP and Jack, RH and Moro, G},
  title = {Action-Sound Latency: Are Our Tools Fast Enough?},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, July 11-15, 2016},
  year = {2016}
}
McPherson AP, Chamberlain A, Hazzard A, McGrath S and Benford S (2016), "Designing for Exploratory Play with a Hackable Digital Musical Instrument", In Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. New York, NY, USA , pp. 1233-1245. ACM.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{McPherson:2016:DEP:2901790.2901831,
  author = {McPherson, Andrew P. and Chamberlain, Alan and Hazzard, Adrian and McGrath, Sean and Benford, Steve},
  title = {Designing for Exploratory Play with a Hackable Digital Musical Instrument},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1233--1245},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2901790.2901831},
  doi = {10.1145/2901790.2901831}
}
Mehrabi A, Dixon S and Sandler M (2015), "Vocal Imitation of Pitch, Spectral Shape and Loudness Envelopes", In International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference., Oct, 2015.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{MehrabiDixonSandler2015,
  author = {Mehrabi, A and Dixon, S and Sandler, M},
  title = {Vocal Imitation of Pitch, Spectral Shape and Loudness Envelopes},
  booktitle = {International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference},
  year = {2015}
}
Moro, G, Bin, A, Jack, R H, Heinrichs, C, McPherson, A P (2016), "Making High-Performance Embedded Instruments with Bela and Pure Data", Jun, 2016. University of Sussex.
Abstract: Bela is an embedded platform for ultra-low latency audio and sensor processing. We present here the hardware and software features of Bela with particular focus on its integration with Pure Data. Sensor inputs on Bela are sampled at audio rate, which opens to the possibility of doing signal processing using Pure Data’s audio-rate objects.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Moro2016,
  author = {Moro, G, Bin, A, Jack, R H, Heinrichs, C, McPherson, A P},
  title = {Making High-Performance Embedded Instruments with Bela and Pure Data},
  publisher = {University of Sussex},
  year = {2016},
  note = {This hands-on workshop introduces participants to Bela, an embedded platform for ultra-low latency audio and sensor processing.},
  url = {http://www.liveinterfaces.org/proceedings2016.html}
}
Nurmikko-Fuller T, Dix A, Weigl DM and Page KR (2016), "In Collaboration with In Concert: Reflecting a Digital Library as Linked Data for Performance Ephemera", In Proceedings of the 3rd International workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology. , pp. 17-24.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Nurmikko-FullerDixWeiglEtAl2016,
  author = {Nurmikko-Fuller, Terhi and Dix, Alan and Weigl, David M. and Page, Kevin R.},
  title = {In Collaboration with In Concert: Reflecting a Digital Library as Linked Data for Performance Ephemera},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 3rd International workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {17--24}
}
Olowe I, Barthet M, Grierson M and Bryan-Kinns N (2016), "FEATUR.UX: An approach to leveraging multitrack information for artistic music visualization", In International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation (TENOR).
Abstract: FEATUR.UX (Feature - ous) is an audio visualisation tool, currently in the process of development, which proposes to introduce a new approach to sound visualisation using pre-mixed, independent multitracks and audio feature ex- traction. Sound visualisation is usually performed using a mixed mono or stereo track of audio. Audio feature ex- traction is commonly used in the field of music information retrieval to create search and recommendation systems for large music databases rather than generating live visual- isations. Visualizing multitrack audio circumvents prob- lems related to the source separation of mixed audio sig- nals and presents an opportunity to examine interdepen- dent relationships within and between separate streams of music. This novel approach to sound visualisation aims to provide an enhanced listening experience in a use case that employs non-tonal, non-notated forms of electronic music. Findings from prior research studies focused on live per- formance and preliminary quantitative results from a user survey have provided the basis from which to develop a prototype for an iterative design study that examines the impact of using multitrack audio and audio feature extrac- tion within sound visualisation practice.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{OloweBarthetGriersonEtAl,
  author = {Olowe, I and Barthet, M and Grierson, M and Bryan-Kinns, N},
  title = {FEATUR.UX: An approach to leveraging multitrack information for artistic music visualization},
  booktitle = {International Conference on Technologies for Music Notation and Representation (TENOR)},
  year = {2016}
}
Olowe I, Moro G and Barthet M (2016), "residUUm: user mapping and performance strategies for multilayered live audiovisual generation", In International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME).
Abstract: We propose residUUm, an audiovisual performance tool that uses sonification to orchestrate a particle system of shapes, as an attempt to build an audiovisual user interface in which all the actions of a performer on a laptop are in- tended to be explicitly interpreted by the audience. We pro- pose two approaches to performing with residUUm and dis- cuss the methods utilized to fulfill the promise of audience- visible interaction: mapping and performance strategies ap- plied to express audiovisual interactions with multilayered sound-image relationships. The system received positive feedback from 34 audience participants on aspects such as aesthetics and audiovisual integration, and we identified fur- ther design challenges around performance clarity and strat- egy. We discuss residUUm’s development objectives, modes of interaction and the impact of an audience-visible inter- face on the performer and observer.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{OloweMoroBarthet,
  author = {Olowe, I and Moro, G and Barthet, M},
  title = {residUUm: user mapping and performance strategies for multilayered live audiovisual generation},
  booktitle = {International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME)},
  year = {2016}
}
Page K (2015), "Music Encoding in Context: MEI and Linked Date", In Music Encoding Conference. Florence, Italy
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Page2015,
  author = {Page, Kevin},
  title = {Music Encoding in Context: MEI and Linked Date},
  booktitle = {Music Encoding Conference},
  year = {2015}
}
Page K (2015), "Making Links: Connecting Humanities Resources for Scholarly Investigation", In Japanese Association of Digital Humanities Conference. Kyoto, Japan
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Page2015a,
  author = {Page, Kevin},
  title = {Making Links: Connecting Humanities Resources for Scholarly Investigation},
  booktitle = {Japanese Association of Digital Humanities Conference},
  year = {2015}
}
Page K, Weigl D, Lewis D and Rindfleisch C (2015), "Prototypical Scenarios for Contextual Navigation with MEI and Linked Data", In Proceedings of the Music Encoding Conference 2016.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{PageWeiglLewisEtAl2015,
  author = {Page, Kevin and Weigl, David and Lewis, David and Rindfleisch, Carolin},
  title = {Prototypical Scenarios for Contextual Navigation with MEI and Linked Data},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the Music Encoding Conference 2016},
  year = {2015}
}
Perez-Carillo, Thalmann F, Fazekas and Sandler (2016), "Geolocation Adaptive Music Player", In 2nd Annual Web Audio Conference.
Abstract: We present a web-based cross-platform adaptive music player that combines music information retrieval (MIR) and audio processing technologies with the interaction capabilities offered by GPS-equipped mobile devices. The application plays back a list of music tracks, which are linked to geographic paths in a map. The music player has two main enhanced features that adjust to the location of the user, namely, adaptable length of the songs and automatic transitions between tracks. Music tracks are represented as data packages containing audio and metadata (descriptive and behavioral) that builds on the concept of Digital Music Object (DMO). This representation, in line with next-generation web technologies, allows for flexible production and consumption of novel musical experiences. A content provider assembles a data pack with music, descriptive analysis and action parameters that users can experience and control within the restrictions and templates defined by the provider.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Perez-CarilloThalmannFazekasEtAl,
  author = {Perez-Carillo and Thalmann, FS and Fazekas and Sandler},
  title = {Geolocation Adaptive Music Player},
  booktitle = {2nd Annual Web Audio Conference},
  year = {2016}
}
Pike M, Ramchurn R, Benford S and Wilson ML (2016), "Scanners: exploring the control of adaptive films using brain-computer interaction", In 34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'16).
Abstract: This paper explores the design space of bio-responsive entertainment, in this case using a film that responds to the brain and blink data of users. A film was created with four parallel channels of footage, where blinking and levels of attention and meditation, as recorded by a commercially available EEG device, affected which footage participants saw. As a performance-led piece of research in the wild, this experience, named Scanners, was presented at a week long national exhibition in the UK. We examined the experiences of 35 viewers, and found that these forms of partially-involuntary control created engaging and enjoyable, but sometimes distracting, experiences. We translate our findings into a two-dimensional design space between the extent of voluntary control that a physiological measure can provide against the level of conscious awareness that the user has of that control. This highlights that novel design opportunities exist when deviating from these two-dimensions - when giving up conscious control and when abstracting the affect of control. Reflection on of how viewers negotiated this space during an experience reveals novel design tactics.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{PikeRamchurnBenfordEtAl2016,
  author = {Matthew Pike and Richard Ramchurn and Steve Benford and Max L. Wilson},
  title = {Scanners: exploring the control of adaptive films using brain-computer interaction},
  booktitle = {34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'16)},
  year = {2016},
  note = {Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM.ISBN 9781450333627. doi: 10.1145/2858036.2858276},
  url = {http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/31332/}
}
Quinton E, Harte C and Sandler M (2015), "Extraction of Metrical Structure from Music Recordings", International conference on Digital Audio Effects., Dec, 2015.
BibTeX:
@article{QuintonHarteSandler2015,
  author = {Quinton, E and Harte, C and Sandler, M},
  title = {Extraction of Metrical Structure from Music Recordings},
  journal = {International conference on Digital Audio Effects},
  year = {2015}
}
Rodriguez-Serrano F, Ewert S, Vera-Candeas P and Sandler M (2016), "A Score-Informed Shift-Invariant Extension of Complex Matrix Factorization for Improving the Separation of Overlapped Partials in Music Recordings", In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP). Shanghai, China
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Rodriguez-SerranoEwertVera-CandeasEtAl2016,
  author = {Rodriguez-Serrano, FJ and Ewert, S and Vera-Candeas, P and Sandler, M},
  title = {A Score-Informed Shift-Invariant Extension of Complex Matrix Factorization for Improving the Separation of Overlapped Partials in Music Recordings},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP)},
  year = {2016}
}
Roure DD, Willcox P and Weigl D (2016), "Numbers into Notes", In Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{RoureWillcoxWeigl2016,
  author = {David De Roure and Pip Willcox and David Weigl},
  title = {Numbers into Notes},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session},
  year = {2016}
}
Roure DD and Willcox P (2016), "Numbers in places: creative interventions in musical space & time", In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct, MobileHCI 2016, Florence, Italy, September 6-9, 2016. , pp. 1059-1063.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{RoureWillcox2016,
  author = {David De Roure and Pip Willcox},
  title = {Numbers in places: creative interventions in musical space & time},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct, MobileHCI 2016, Florence, Italy, September 6-9, 2016},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {1059--1063},
  url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2957265.2964199},
  doi = {10.1145/2957265.2964199}
}
Roure DD, Willcox P and Abdul-Rahman A (2016), "On the description of process in digital scholarship", In Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Humanities in the Semantic Web co-located with 13th ESWC Conference 2016 (ESWC 2016), Anissaras, Greece, May 29th, 2016.. , pp. 79-84.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{RoureWillcoxAbdul-Rahman2016,
  author = {David De Roure and Pip Willcox and Alfie Abdul-Rahman},
  title = {On the description of process in digital scholarship},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on Humanities in the Semantic Web co-located with 13th ESWC Conference 2016 (ESWC 2016), Anissaras, Greece, May 29th, 2016.},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {79--84},
  url = {http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1608/paper-10.pdf}
}
Thalmann, F S, Fazekas, G, Wiggins, G, Sandler, M B (2016), "Creating, Visualizing, and Analyzing Dynamic Music Objects in the Browser with the Dymo Designer", Audio Mostly 2016
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Thalmann,
  author = {Thalmann, F S, Fazekas, G, Wiggins, G, Sandler, M B},
  title = {Creating, Visualizing, and Analyzing Dynamic Music Objects in the Browser with the Dymo Designer},
  year = {2016}
}
Thalmann, F S, Perez-Carillo, A, Fazekas, G, Wiggins, G, Sandler, M (2016), "The Mobile Audio Ontology: Experiencing Dynamic Music Objects on Mobile Devices", Tenth IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing, 2016
Abstract: This paper is about the Mobile Audio Ontology, a semantic audio framework for the design of novel music consumption experiences on mobile devices. The framework is based on the concept of the Dynamic Music Object which is an amalgamation of audio files, structural and analytical information extracted from the audio, and information about how it should be rendered in realtime. The Mobile Audio Ontology allows producers and distributors to specify a great variety of ways of playing back music in controlled indeterministic as well as adaptive and interactive ways. Users can map mobile sensor data, user interface controls, or autonomous control units hidden from the listener to any musical parameter exposed in the definition of a Dynamic Music Object. These mappings can also be made dependent on semantic and analytical information extracted from the audio.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Thalmanna,
  author = {Thalmann, F S, Perez-Carillo, A, Fazekas, G, Wiggins, G, Sandler, M},
  title = {The Mobile Audio Ontology: Experiencing Dynamic Music Objects on Mobile Devices}
}
Thalmann F, Ewert S, Sandler M and Wiggins G (2015), "Spatially Rendering Decomposed Recordings - Integrating Score-Informed Source Separation and Semantic Playback Technologies", In International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR) - Late-Breaking Session. Málaga, Spain , pp. 2-2.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ThalmannEwertSandlerEtAl2015,
  author = {Thalmann, F and Ewert, S and Sandler, M and Wiggins, GA},
  title = {Spatially Rendering Decomposed Recordings - Integrating Score-Informed Source Separation and Semantic Playback Technologies},
  booktitle = {International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR) - Late-Breaking Session},
  year = {2015},
  pages = {2--2}
}
Thalmann F, Perez-Carillo, Fazekas, Wiggins and Sandler (), "The Mobile Audio Ontology: Experiencing Dynamic Music Objects on Mobile Devices", In Tenth IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing.
Abstract: This paper is about the Mobile Audio Ontology, a semantic audio framework for the design of novel music consumption experiences on mobile devices. The framework is based on the concept of the Dynamic Music Object which is an amalgamation of audio files, structural and analytical information extracted from the audio, and information about how it should be rendered in realtime. The Mobile Audio Ontology allows producers and distributors to specify a great variety of ways of playing back music in controlled indeterministic as well as adaptive and interactive ways. Users can map mobile sensor data, user interface controls, or autonomous control units hidden from the listener to any musical parameter exposed in the definition of a Dynamic Music Object. These mappings can also be made dependent on semantic and analytical information extracted from the audio.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ThalmannPerez-CarilloFazekasEtAl,
  author = {Thalmann, FS and Perez-Carillo and Fazekas and Wiggins and Sandler},
  title = {The Mobile Audio Ontology: Experiencing Dynamic Music Objects on Mobile Devices},
  booktitle = {Tenth IEEE International Conference on Semantic Computing}
}
Thalmann F, Perez-Carillo A, Fazekas, Wiggins and Sandler (), "The Semantic Music Player: A Smart Mobile Player Based on Ontological Structures and Analytical Feature Metadata", In 2nd Annual Web Audio Conference.
Abstract: The Semantic Music Player is a cross-platform web and mobile app built with Ionic and the Web Audio API that explores new ways of playing back music on mobile devices, particularly indeterministic, context-dependent, and interactive ways. It is based on Dynamic Music Objects, a format that represents musical content and structure in an abstract way and makes it modifiable within definable constraints. For each Dynamic Music Object, the Semantic Music Player generates a custom graphical interface and enables appropriate user interface controls and mobile sensors based on its requirements. When the object is played back, the player takes spontaneous decisions based on the given structural information and the analytical data and reacts to sensor and user interface inputs. In this paper, we introduce the player and its underlying concepts and give some examples of the potentially infinite amount of use cases and musical results.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ThalmannPerez-CarilloFazekasEtAla,
  author = {Thalmann, FS and Perez-Carillo, A and Fazekas and Wiggins and Sandler},
  title = {The Semantic Music Player: A Smart Mobile Player Based on Ontological Structures and Analytical Feature Metadata},
  booktitle = {2nd Annual Web Audio Conference}
}
Tian, M, Sandler, M B (2016), "Music Structural Segmentation Across Genres with Gammatone Features", 17th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, 2016
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Tian,
  author = {Tian, M, Sandler, M B},
  title = {Music Structural Segmentation Across Genres with Gammatone Features},
  year = {2016}
}
Tian, M. and Sandler, M B (2016), "Towards Music Structural Segmentation Across Genres: Features, Structural Hypotheses and Annotation Principles", ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology., Nov, 2016.
BibTeX:
@article{Tian2016,
  author = {Tian, M, Sandler, Mark B},
  title = {Towards Music Structural Segmentation Across Genres: Features, Structural Hypotheses and Annotation Principles},
  journal = {ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology},
  year = {2016}
}
Wang, S., Ewert S and Dixon S (2016), "Robust and efficient joint alignment of multiple musical performances", IEEE/ACM Transactions on Audio Speech and Language Processing., Nov, 2016. Vol. 24, pp. 2132-2145.
Abstract: © 2014 IEEE.The goal of music alignment is to map each temporal position in one version of a piece of music to the corresponding positions in other versions of the same piece. Despite considerable improvements in recent years, state-of-the-art methods still often fail to identify a correct alignment if versions differ substantially with respect to acoustic conditions or musical interpretation. To increase the robustness for these cases, we exploit in this work the availability of multiple versions of the piece to be aligned. By processing these jointly, we can supply the alignment process with additional examples of how a section might be interpreted or which acoustic conditions may arise. This way, we can use alignment information between two versions transitively to stabilize the alignment with a third version. Extending our previous work [1], we present two such joint alignment methods, progressive alignment and probabilistic profile, and discuss their fundamental differences and similarities on an algorithmic level. Our systematic experiments using 376 recordings of 9 pieces demonstrate that both methods can indeed improve the alignment accuracy and robustness over comparable pairwise methods. Further, we provide an in-depth analysis of the behavior of both joint alignment methods, studying the influence of parameters such as the number of performances available, comparing their computational costs, and investigating further strategies to increase both.
BibTeX:
@article{Wang2016,
  author = {Wang, S, Ewert, S, Dixon, S},
  title = {Robust and efficient joint alignment of multiple musical performances},
  journal = {IEEE/ACM Transactions on Audio Speech and Language Processing},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {24},
  pages = {2132--2145},
  doi = {10.1109/TASLP.2016.2598318}
}
Wang S, Ewert S and Dixon S (2014), "Robust Joint Alignment of Multiple Versions of a Piece of Music", In 15th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference. , pp. 83-88.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WangEwertDixon2014,
  author = {Wang, S and Ewert, S and Dixon, S},
  title = {Robust Joint Alignment of Multiple Versions of a Piece of Music},
  booktitle = {15th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference},
  year = {2014},
  pages = {83--88}
}
Wang S, Ewert S and Dixon S (2015), "Compensating for Asynchronies between Musical Voices in Score-Performance Alignment", In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WangEwertDixon2015,
  author = {Wang, S and Ewert, S and Dixon, S},
  title = {Compensating for Asynchronies between Musical Voices in Score-Performance Alignment},
  booktitle = {IEEE International Conference on Acoustics Speech and Signal Processing},
  year = {2015}
}
Weigl D, Lewis D, Crawford T and Page K (2015), "Expert-guided semantic linking of music-library metadata for study and reuse", In 2nd International Workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology. Knoxwille, TN, USA
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WeiglLewisCrawfordEtAl2015,
  author = {Weigl, David and Lewis, David and Crawford, Tim and Page, Kevin},
  title = {Expert-guided semantic linking of music-library metadata for study and reuse},
  booktitle = {2nd International Workshop on Digital Libraries for Musicology},
  year = {2015}
}
Weigl D, Page K, Lewis D, Crawford T and Knopke I (2015), "Unified Access to Media Industry and Academic Datasets: A Case Study in Early Music", In 16th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference. Malaga, Spain
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WeiglPageLewisEtAl2015,
  author = {Weigl, David and Page, Kevin and Lewis, David and Crawford, Tim and Knopke, Ian},
  title = {Unified Access to Media Industry and Academic Datasets: A Case Study in Early Music},
  booktitle = {16th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference},
  year = {2015}
}
Weigl D, Page K, Lewis D, Crawford T and Knopke I (2015), "Unified Access to Media Industry and Academic Datasets: A Case Study in Early Music", In DMRN+10: Digital Music Research Network. London, UK
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WeiglPageLewisEtAl2015a,
  author = {Weigl, David and Page, Kevin and Lewis, David and Crawford, Tim and Knopke, Ian},
  title = {Unified Access to Media Industry and Academic Datasets: A Case Study in Early Music},
  booktitle = {DMRN+10: Digital Music Research Network},
  year = {2015}
}
Weigl DM, Bartlett JC, Steele D and Guastavino C (2016), "MIR User Studies Through the Lense of MIR User Studies: Promoting the Impact of MIR User Research", In Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WeiglBartlettSteeleEtAl2016,
  author = {Weigl, David M and Bartlett, Joan C and Steele, Daniel and Guastavino, Catherine},
  title = {MIR User Studies Through the Lense of MIR User Studies: Promoting the Impact of MIR User Research},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session},
  year = {2016}
}
Weigl DM and Page KR (2016), "Dynamic Semantic Notation: Jamming Together Music Encoding and Linked Data", In Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{WeiglPage2016,
  author = {Weigl, David M. and Page, Kevin R.},
  title = {Dynamic Semantic Notation: Jamming Together Music Encoding and Linked Data},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 17th Intmernational Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference: Late-Breaking/Demo Session},
  year = {2016}
}
Wilmering, T, Thalmann, F, Sandler, M B (2016), "Grateful Live: Mixing Multiple Recordings of a Dead Performance into an Immersive Experience", In Proceedings of the Audio Engineering Society Convention 141. Los Angeles, CA
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Wilmering2016,
  author = {Wilmering, T, Thalmann, F, Sandler, M B},
  title = {Grateful Live: Mixing Multiple Recordings of a Dead Performance into an Immersive Experience},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the Audio Engineering Society Convention 141},
  year = {2016},
  note = {date-added: 2016-08-23 17:17:44 +0000 date-modified: 2016-08-23 17:22:38 +0000}
}
Zhang L, Wu Y and Barthet M (2016), "A Web Application for Audience Participation in Live Music Performance: The Open Symphony Use Case", In International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression., Jul, 2016.
Abstract: This paper presents a web-based application enabling au-
diences to collaboratively contribute to the creative pro-
cess during live music performances. The system aims at
enhancing audience engagement and creating new forms
of live music experiences. Interaction between audience
and performers is made possible through a client/server
architecture enabling bidirectional communication of cre-
ative data. Audience members can vote for pre-determined
musical attributes using a smartphone-friendly and cross-
platform web application. The system gathers audience
members' votes and provide feedback through visualisations
that can be tailored for speci c needs. In order to sup-
port multiple performers and large audiences, automatic
audience-to-performer groupings are handled by the appli-
cation. The framework was applied to support live interac-
tive musical improvisations where creative roles are shared
amongst audience and performers (Open Symphony). Qual-
itative analyses of user surveys highlighted very positive
feedback related to themes such as engagement and cre-
ativity and also identi ed further design challenges around
audience sense of control and latency.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{ZhangWuBarthet2016,
  author = {Zhang, L and Wu, Y and Barthet, M},
  title = {A Web Application for Audience Participation in Live Music Performance: The Open Symphony Use Case},
  booktitle = {International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression},
  year = {2016}
}